HAGGiS Adventures Compass Buster Tour: Day 2 – The Trussel Stone and Gearrannan Blackhouse Village

After a wee break for an epic Iceland holiday, we’re back and ready to take you back to our trip to Scotland. We last left off on Day 2 of our Haggis Adventures Compass Buster 10 day tour!

So, we had just visited the Butt of Lewis and Port Stoth beach and there was much, much, much more to see that day! I already felt like I had seen so much.

Our next stop would be a standing stone! For any of you Outlander fans out there, you may remember we tried to find Jamie Fraser in Ireland at Blarney Castle. Seeing as that didn’t work out, we were more than a little excited to actually be in Scotland where the book took place! The chances of finding Jamie were definitely much higher here than in Ireland, right?! 😛

That being said, Greg drove us up to a place where there were literally no tourists and no big signs indicating that this was a tourist site. This is the site of The Trussel Stone (Clach an Trushal) – said to be the tallest standing stone in all of Scotland.

When I first saw it, in the setting it was in, I felt completely transported to another time! It is interesting to see that there are so many of these structures around Scotland. I also found it really impressive – how could they have been raised and still remain standing to this day?!

The stone is located in the village of Ballantrushal on the west side of the Isle of Lewis. It is 5.8 meters tall above ground! It was just our luck that as we got out of the bus to take a closer look, a local gentleman happened to see our bus and came out of his house to talk to us! Again this was so interesting! We got to hear the story of the stone right from a local Scot who had been living on this land his whole life.

Since we were in the land of folklore and magic, I can’t say I am surprised that this fellow had such a halo around him :-P. Trick of the light or does he have a bit of magic to him? You decide, haha!

As you can see from the picture, he was ready for the elements with his wellies and was very passionate in telling us some of the stories associated with the Trussel Stone.

“Local legend says that it marks the site of a great battle, the last to be fought between the feuding clans of the Macaulays and Morrisons”

He also mentioned that there had been a circle of stones that had stood here thousands of years ago. This is the last remaining stone of that circle. It is also known that you can pinpoint many other circles in the region based on the location of this one, which was an interesting fact – meaning maybe all the stone circles were somehow connected in a way?

It has been found that this stone has no direct relation to any solar or lunar lines, nor stellar constellations. You can find more information on these speculations here. That being said and as I mentioned earlier, it is still a good start to Stone Circle searching in the area and it was amazing to ponder how these structures were lifted and engineered so long ago!

As you can see from the pictures, we did try to channel our inner Claire Randall’s and transport ourselves to Jamie Fraser but…nope it didn’t work. Worth a shot though :-P!

After the gentleman had finished telling us his stories and we had gotten enough photos of this gigantic structure, we headed back to our yellow bus and were on our way to our next stop: the Gearrannan Blackhouse Village!

The Gearrannan Blackhouses were part of a crofting township on the Isle of Lewis in the Outer Hebrides! These homes were inhabited and used for crofting up to the 1970’s!

The Blackhouses are made of stone with thatched roofs, as you can see from the pictures.

“The double drystone walls, the low profile and the insulating thatch made the houses suitable for the Hebridean weather, and they were indeed eco-friendly houses in that all the building materials were natural and found locally.”

It was after the last residents moved out in the late 1970’s that the whole zone was declared a conservation area.

The inside of some of the houses have been conserved to represent what they were used for in the past. It was interesting to how people lived in these blackhouses – what they had in their homes, their peat fires and some of their traditional activities, including the weaving of the famous Harris Tweed!

Today, the village also serves as an area for holiday accommodations! Because of its location, close to the Callanish Standing Stones and Dun Carloway Broch, this is an ideal place to stay to explore the area!

It is open all year round and there are a great number of activities to partake in around the area including, fishing, hiking, cycling, etc. There is a self-catering hostel on site – though they do advise you to bring your own food since there are no shops in the area! You can find more information on accommodations here.

Another benefit of staying here would be the coastal walk! We, unfortunately, didn’t have enough time to do the walk but the view of the beaches and water below were very tempting!!! Again, I can’t express how shocked I was at the beauty of the beaches in both Ireland and Scotland. I honestly didn’t think that this would be one of the main attractions of both countries, but there you go!

 

As we were leaving, we noticed something we had already gotten to know very well in Scotland: PEAT! This house in particular was already getting ready of the winter and had its peat piles ready to go. Again, very self catering and self sufficient.

Our next stop would be spectacular Dun Carloway Broch and the Callanish Standing Stones.

Stay tuned!

From Vancouver with Love,

Ioana and Natalie

LettersofWanderlust3


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